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Image Credits

Caption
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Daniel Madison

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Illustration by Jeffrey Decoster

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Ben Barres

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Stanford scientists have created new tools that let researchers read brain activity by observing glowing trails of light spreading between connected nerves.

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Gary Steinberg

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Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences
 

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A multiple exposure shows the effect of an impact to the top of the helmet in a laboratory experiment. A head impact detection system using the instrumented mouthguard distinguishes between these...

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Michelle Monje is senior author of a paper that found neuronal activity causes changes in myelin.

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Ann Arvin, Vice Provost and Dean of Research

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A family of proteins called neurexins (shown here as purple, beaded structures) plays a key role in the formation and function of synaptic connections.  An estimated 2,500 isoforms of neurexins...

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Natalie Rasgon

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Gregory Scherrer

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Michael Snyder

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Natalie Rasgon

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Victor Carrion

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Marius Wernig

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Thomas Rando

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Vinod Menon

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Thomas Rando

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John Oghalai

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Ahmad Salehi

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Ben Barres

The steady accumulation of a protein in healthy, aging brains may explain seniors’ vulnerability to neurodegenerative disorders, a new study by researchers at the...
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Tony Wyss-Coray

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Robert Malenka and Gul Dolen (right) found that the hormne known as oxytocin plays a stronger role in social bonding than previously thought.

 

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Professor Chris Chafe and undergraduate researcher Michael Iorga discuss the patterns of brain activity seen in the graphic representation of the seizure as recorded by multiple electrodes.

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David Magnus

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Michael Lin

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Joshua Elias

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All natural materials have a positive index of refraction – the degree to which they refract light. The nanoscale artificial "atoms" that constitute the metamaterial prism shown here, however,...

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Aaron Gitler

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Michael Snyder

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Anthony Ricci

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Stanford scientists are developing a force probe to study hair cells and find solutions to hearing loss.

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Anthony Ricci

370 Stanford Neurosciences Institute Interdisciplinary Scholar Awards
371 Stanford Neurosciences Institute Interdisciplinary Scholar Awards
372 Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute
373 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, David Camarillo
374 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Bill Newsome
375 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Tom Dean
376 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Helen Bronte-Stewart
377 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Tony Wyss-Coray
378 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Keith Humphreys
379 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Connie Cepko
380 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Bill Newsome
381 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Allison Okamura
382 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Jaimie Henderson
383 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, EJ Chichilnisky
384 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, World Economic Forum
385 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, NIH Grant
386 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, NIH Grant
387 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, NIH Grant
388 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, NIH Grant
389 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, EPFL
390 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Big Ideas
391 NeuroChoice Big Idea, Stanford Neurosciences Institute
392 NeuroTechnology Initiative Big Idea, Stanford Neurosciences Institute
393 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Big Ideas in Neuroscience
394 Stanford Neurosciences Institute Seminar Series
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Fig. 1. Eye structure and identification of the retina

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Fig. 1  A cloudy lens prevents light from reaching the back of the eye.

398 NeuroDiscovery

NeuroDiscovery

Probing the inner workings of the brain

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400 Stanford Neurosciences Institute, 2014 Symposium

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