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Graduation awards announced

Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Ann Arvin

By Kathleen J. Sullivan

Seven members of the Stanford community have been named recipients of the 2018 Cuthbertson, Dinkelspiel and Gores awards, which honor individuals for exceptional contributions to Stanford, for distinctive contributions to undergraduate education and for excellence in teaching.

This year’s recipients will receive their awards on Sunday, June 17, during the 127th Commencement ceremony in Stanford Stadium.

Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Commencement

Cuthbertson Award

Ann Arvin, vice provost and dean of research, a professor of microbiology and immunology and the Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics, is the 2018 winner of the Kenneth M. Cuthberson Award for Exceptional Service to Stanford University. The Cuthbertson Award, established by members of the faculty in 1981, was named after one of the early architects of Stanford’s long-term financial planning and fundraising program.

Arvin was honored “for her strategic insight, sage advice and generous encouragement” and “for her deep understanding of the intricacies of successful partnerships.”

She was commended “for bringing great diversity of experience, dedication, intellect and humor to her role at Stanford” and “for her knowledge, integrity, perseverance, dedication and compassion.”

Dinkelspiel Awards

The Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contributions to Undergraduate Education, named after the late president of the Board of Trustees who served from 1953 to 1958, recognizes outstanding service to undergraduate education and the quality of student life.

The 2018 Dinkelspiel Award recipients are Alexis Kallen, Amy Larimer and Stephen Stedman.

Alexis Kallen is a bachelor’s degree candidate in political science with interdisciplinary honors in democracy, development, and the rule of law.

Kallen was honored “for enhancing the experience of students on campus and pushing herself and others to understand and contribute to the world beyond Stanford” and “for being a motivated, innovative, committed and smart leader.”

She was commended “for her positive attitude and genuine faith in humanity” and “for her infectious enthusiasm.”

Amy Larimer is a lecturer in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the assistant director of the Architectural Design Program and a resident fellow in Rinconada, a dorm for first-year students located in the Wilbur Hall community of dorms on the east side of campus.

Larimer was honored “for being an outstanding teacher, listener, mentor and supporter” and “for navigating the complexities of teaching architecture and ensuring an invaluable and meaningful experience for each student.”

She was commended “for her deep commitment to expanding students’ intellectual and interpersonal capacities” and “for being a kind, generous and open individual who does everything she can to help students.”

Stephen J. Stedman is a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a professor, by courtesy, of political science.

Stedman was honored “for his work in shaping the intellectual development of students with thoughtful and forward-thinking ideas” and “for his profound and lasting contributions to the quality and richness of the undergraduate experience.”

He was commended “for being a trusted mentor and supervisor” and “for his humble pursuit of excellence and commitment as an educator.”

Gores Awards

The Walter J. Gores Award is the university’s highest teaching honor. The award is named for the late Professor Walter J. Gores, a member of the Stanford Class of 1917 who became a professor of design at the University of Michigan.

Michele Elam is a professor of English, the William Robertson Coe Professor, the Olivier Nomellini Family University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and director of the interdisciplinary graduate program, Modern Thought and Literature.

Elam was honored “for her unwavering support of students’ dreams, hopes and ambitions” and “for her skillful lectures that demonstrate the merit of interdisciplinary engagement with literature.”

She was commended “for fostering a spirit of kindness, respect, debate and humor in the classroom” and “for emphasizing the importance of art, culture and creative expression as means of both understanding and shaping the world.”

Richard Nevle, a lecturer and deputy director of the Earth Systems Program, was honored “for his relentless work to deliver the best education for students and to provide insightful and sensitive advice” and “for being the ultimate team player to the point of self-effacement.”

He was commended “for motivating students from diverse academic backgrounds to challenge themselves and each other” and “for exhibiting generosity, kindness and insight in advising and teaching.”

Delaney Sullivan, a master’s candidate in computer science, was honored “for being relatable, understanding and sympathetic” and “for expanding teaching into mentorship.”

He was commended “for his personal dedication and his sacrifices for the good of the students” and “for exemplifying an amazing commitment to learning, teaching and helping students grow.”