Skip to content Skip to navigation

Media Coverage

Feb 4 2016 | Forbes
On Thursday, Stanford University named Marc Tessier-Lavigne its 11th president. The first of his family to graduate college, the neuroscientist and former Rhodes Scholar will succeed current Stanford head John Hennessy, who is departing after 16 years in the role.
Feb 4 2016 | Forbes
Stanford University named neuroscientist, entrepreneur and former Genentech executive Marc Tessier-Lavigne its 11th president on Thursday, an appointment that will likely continue the school’s strong connections to Silicon Valley and the technology industry.
Feb 4 2016 | San Jose Mercury News
Stanford University on Thursday named a neuroscientist with stellar research and biotech credentials to be its 11th president, underscoring the university's continued commitment to science.
Feb 4 2016 | Palo Alto Online
Marc Tessier-Lavigne, a former faculty member, named university's 11th president
Feb 1 2016 | Harvard Business Review
Why are we always exhausted at the end of a workday? Why do we come home wiped out, with barely enough energy to make dinner before collapsing for the night?
Jan 28 2016 | Stanford Medicine - Scope
Brain scientists have devised an algorithm that spontaneously decodes human conscious thought at the speed of experience.
Jan 25 2016 | Stanford Medicine - Scope
As the founding director of Stanford’s Headache and Facial Pain Clinic, and a migraine sufferer himself, Robert Cowan, MD, is well-positioned to offer headache guidance (and insight for outsiders like me).
Jan 23 2016 | BizNews.com
The more mankind uncovers the secrets of nature, the more we realise how parallels to the human condition exist in other life forms. Among them is the social structure of the humble ant, the subject of this interview with Deborah Gordon, Professor of Biology at Stanford University, an exclusive US...
Jan 22 2016 | World Economic Forum
As emerging technologies open up new prospects for enhancing health and productivity, how can we ensure that our humanity and humanness are not lost?
Jan 22 2016 | World Economic Forum
As neuroscientists decipher the workings of the brain, new questions will be raised about decoding memories, ascertaining intentions and defusing criminal behaviour. What if neuro-evidence is invited into the courtroom?

Pages