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NeURO Fellowship Application and Eligibility

The 2021 NeURO Fellowship application is now open.

Prospective applicants must review the eligibility and application information below.

 
Key dates for the 2021 NeURO Fellowship application
Application deadline 5 pm PT on Nov. 25, 2020
Notification of award By Dec. 14, 2020
Program start date Winter quarter, 2021
Funding period 10-week research session, spring or summer quarter 2021 (during your Flex quarter)
To apply Apply

Eligibility

Student applicants

Stanford freshman, sophomore and junior undergraduate students are welcome to apply, and students who do not have previous laboratory experience and or are from groups underrepresented in STEM fields are particularly encouraged to do so.
 
Students must apply in collaboration with a faculty member who welcomes the applicant to join their lab; prospective applicants who have not yet found a lab are encouraged to explore our directory of undergraduate neuroscience research opportunities, and to contact labs of interest to them.
 

NeURO fellows must agree to participate in all program elements, including:

  • One-unit winter quarter remote research immersion course to learn research fundamentals, read scientific articles and practice science communication
  • One-unit spring quarter remote neuroscience foundations and journal club course
  • One quarter (10 weeks) of part-time mentorship and research in the student's host research lab, 8-10 hours/week, the quarter before your full-time research
  • One quarter (10 weeks) of full-time (40 hrs/week) research in the student's host lab
  • Poster session

Applicants must be currently enrolled (not on Leave of Absence). Students will be eligible for full time project support only in the spring or summer quarter, only once per academic year per student, only if the student has been fully enrolled in at least two previous quarters this year, and only if the student is using their Flex Term during the full-time project. "Full-time" means that the student's only major time commitment is the project; students are expected to spend 35+ hours per week over the entire 10-week quarter on the project.  Students may take up to 5 units of coursework concurrently with a full-time project.

Faculty mentors

The Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute highly values strong and considered mentorship for our NeURO fellows. Prospective faculty mentors are required to submit a Training and Mentorship Plan as a part of the student's application. Students are encouraged (but not required) to discuss their training and mentorship plan with their faculty or other research mentors in their host lab.

Funding

NeURO fellows will receive a stipend for 10 weeks of full-time research during spring or summer quarter. The stipend amount will be determined in accordance with guidelines released by the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, and varies based on whether the student will be living on Stanford's campus during their research quarter. The baseline stipend is $5,000; students living on campus will receive an additional $2,500 to accommodate the cost of travel and campus housing. We are very aware that many students experience some degree of financial need that could impact their ability to engage in research; NeURO fellows determined by the Financial Aid Office to have financial need will be eligible for additional funding on top of the baseline or baseline + campus housing amount.  

COVID impacts

Although we are hopeful that students will be able to conduct research on campus during spring or summer quarter, we must also prepare for the possibility that the pandemic will keep us all working remotely. If your proposed research project would require you to be on campus, please talk with your mentors about a remote research project that you could work on if undergraduate researchers are not allowed in lab (e.g., data analysis, literature review, programming, etc.). There will be opportunities to describe both your primary proposed research project and your alternative remote project (if applicable) in the application.

Application 

The 2021 NeURO Fellowship application is now open.

Apply

Application components

In addition to basic information about the student applicant, their faculty research mentor and the graduate student/postdoc/staff lab mentor they will work with on a daily basis (if applicable), the application consists of six further short questions:
 
  1. List of biology or neuroscience courses taken, in progress or planned: Please list the biology or neuroscience-related courses you have already completed, are currently taking, or plan to take during the 2020-21 academic year. For each, include the course number, name and status. For example: PSYC 54N - Genes, Memes and Behavior (planned for Spring 2021). A partial list of neuroscience-related courses is available on the Stanford Undergraduate Neuroscience Society website.
  2. Previous research experience: Previous research experience is NOT required for NeURO applicants, and students who do not have previous laboratory experience are particularly encouraged to apply! If you do have previous research experience, please briefly describe it (e.g., when you did the research and for how long, at which institution and with whom, what type of research). Keep your answer as short as possible, no more than 100 - 200 words max. Responses longer than 200 words will not be considered.
  3. Diversity statement: We wish to bring together a cohort of NeURO fellows who represent a diversity of backgrounds, characteristics and life experiences. Share something about yourself or your experiences that you find allows you to bring a unique perspective to a group. Students from groups underrepresented in STEM fields are particularly encouraged to apply! Word length: 100 - 200 words. Responses longer than 200 words will not be considered.
  4. Interest statement: Please describe either why are you interested in becoming a NeURO fellow. Word length: 100 - 200 words. Responses longer than 200 words will not be considered.
  5. Project description: Describe the big question or goal that your planned research relates to, and how your work will contribute to addressing that question or achieving that goal. Please describe your project as if you were writing to a classmate or roommate with your academic background (i.e., write in a way that is not overly technical, and that you understand!). You are encouraged to talk with your research mentors about this section of your application. This question pertains to your primary proposed project only; you will describe alternative remote plans (if applicable) in a later question. Word length: 100 - 200 words. Responses longer than 200 words will not be considered.
  6. Your role in the project: Please described your planned role in the project. For example: What methods will you be learning and applying, what data will you be trying to collect, or what analyses will you conduct? You are encouraged to talk with your research mentors about this section of your application. This question pertains to your primary proposed project only; you will describe alternative remote plans (if applicable) in a later question. Word length: 100 - 200 words. Responses longer than 200 words will not be considered.
  7. COVID plans: How would your proposed research project change if undergrad students are not able to be on campus during your Flex quarter? Please describe your alternative remote research project (if applicable). You are encouraged to talk with your research mentors about this section of your application. Word length: 100 - 200 words. Responses longer than 200 words will not be considered.

In addition, the student applicant must use the application form to request a "recommendation" from their faculty research mentor. The faculty member will then receive an automated email asking them to complete a Training and Mentorship Plan for the applicant (note that this is NOT a letter of recommendation). Students are encouraged (but not required) to discuss their training and mentorship plan with their faculty or other research mentors in their host lab.

Questions?

Contact Elise Kleeman (elisek@stanford.edu), Scientific Program Manager for the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute.