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Neuro-omics

Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Big Ideas in Neuroscience

Our Vision

Life sciences are in the midst of an “omics” revolution. New technologies in the past two decades, largely propelled by the human genome project, have enabled scientists to study many biological questions at the scale of all genes (genomics) and all their protein products (proteomics). We are now proposing to bring the omics revolution to the brain, the most complex organ with the largest number of cell types. With leaders spanning genomics, proteomics, basic and clinical neuroscience, and computer science, we will create a suite of new tools and analysis methods that allow neuroscientists to interrogate what genes and proteins are produced in their favorite neuronal types, and what other neuronal types their favorite neurons connect with. These neuronal types include not only those traditionally defined by where they are and what type of neurotransmitters they produce, but also how they are activated by any stimulus or behavioral episode. The success of these efforts will help fill the chasm between our understanding of the brain at the level of genes and proteins on one hand, and circuits and systems on the other hand, with important clinical applications. It will also propel Stanford to the position of world leader in “neuro-omics.”

Participants

Team Members:

Jure Leskovec (computer science)
Sergiu Pasca (psychiatry)
Funding Type: 
Big Idea
Round: 
2
Phase: 
1
Award Year: 
2018