Catalyst Grants | Knight Initiative for Brain Resilience

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As we age, our cognitive abilities decline, and many of us may experience memory loss, dementia, or neurodegeneration. However, research shows that some individuals are resilient to the ravages of time and remain cognitively intact even after reaching 100 years of age. 

What if we could evade the aging process, resist genetic risk factors of cognitive decline, or even reverse aspects of brain aging altogether?

The Knight Initiative for Brain Resilience is seeking creative and bold proposals from Stanford research and clinical faculty with PI eligibility that have the potential to generate paradigm-shifting insights into healthy brain aging and resilience against cognitive decline and neurodegenerative disorders.

Application and eligibility information

"About 1 in 10,000 individuals reaches age 100 cognitively unscathed — seemingly resilient to the effects of time. The Phil and Penny Knight Initiative for Brain Resilience seeks to emulate this sidestepping of the aging process and raise the hope of reversing brain aging altogether. " 

— Tony Wyss-Coray, Director, Knight Initiative for Brain Resilience

Open

Catalyst Grants Application

Application deadline: April 22, 2024

Please review the application and eligibility information before applying. In brief:

  • Stanford research and clinical faculty with PI eligibility (UTL, MCL, or NTL-research appointments) may apply
  • Previous Innovation or Catalyst award PIs are only eligible to submit as a Co-PI on this round
  • Applicants may request up to $500,000 in direct costs over a 2-year duration

Funded Catalyst grant projects

Knight Initiative for Brain Resilience
Catalyst Award
2022
Sleep circuits in neurodegenerative disease and aging

This team plans to study whether changes in neurons in the midbrain that regulate sleep, wakefulness, and immunity could contribute to aging and neurodegeneration. If successful, this information could rescue deficits in sleep and restore a normal immune profile.

Knight Initiative for Brain Resilience
Catalyst Award
2022
Mitochondrial DNA and Brain Resilience

This team proposes the first comprehensive study of how mitochondrial DNA is related to cognitive function and susceptibility to dementia in a diverse population of over 11,000 adults. The outcomes of this study will provide insight into possible racial disparities in brain health.