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Stanford Hospital & Clinics is breaking ground this month for a new building that will bring key programs and services from Neurology, Neurosurgery and Radiology under one roof.
Feb 19 2014 | Stanford Report
A team of Stanford Neuroengineers has developed mice whose sensitivity to pain can be dialed up or down by shining light on their paws. The research could help scientists understand and eventually treat chronic pain in humans.
Feb 13 2014 | Stanford Report
Exposure to child-directed speech sharpens infants' language processing skills and can predict future success. New work indicates early intervention can improve language skills in kids lagging behind.
Feb 10 2014 | NeuWrite West Blog
Graduate students take questions from the public and answer them on the blog Neuwrite West as part of their Ask the Expert series.
Feb 7 2014 | NeuWrite West Blog
Graduate student Marlieke van Kesteren heard a talk at Stanford by Skidmore college assistant professor Corinne Moss-Racusin about gender diversity in academia. Inspired, she wrote for the Neuwrite West blog about how we can all help improve diversity.
Feb 6 2014 | Stanford Report
Stanford graduate students take human and animal brains into middle schools in Palo Alto and East Palo Alto.
Feb 6 2014 | NeuWrite West Blog
Graduate students take questions from the public and answer them on the blog Neuwrite West as part of their Ask the Expert series.
When is a person considered dead? Two recent cases have thrust the issue of "brain death" back into the national conversation. David Magnus, PhD, director of the Stanford Center for Bioethics, explains why he believes that the laws and ethics governing brain death should not be changed.
Stanford Neurosciences graduate students bring brains for local middle school students to study during Brain Day.
Our brains have billions of neurons grouped into different regions. These regions often work alone but sometimes must join forces. Stanford Neurosciences Institute member Krishna Shenoy investigates how regions communicate selectively.

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