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Funded Research Projects

NeuroEngineering | Big Idea
Lead Researcher(s): Nicholas Melosh
Creating an incubator for next-generation neural interface platforms.
NeuroHealth | EPFL-Stanford Exchange
Lead Researcher(s): Richard E. Grewelle
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease second only to malaria in its human health and economic impact on tropical nations. For over a century, large efforts to control the disease in effected communities have been met with limited success because elimination requires both treatment of humans and...
NeuroHealth | EPFL-Stanford Exchange
Lead Researcher(s): Daniel S. Joyce
Although you’re aware of the light that you see, light also affects us in ways that you might not appreciate. These so called “non-image forming” (NIF) pathways were recently discovered, they start in the human eye before projecting to over a dozen brain regions. They modulate aspects of human...
NeuroHealth | Seed Grant
This project will develop PET ligands to image where and when the earliest microglial changes occur in Alzheimer's Disease to aid in early detection of the disease and development of new therapeutics.
NeuroDiscovery | Seed Grant
We aim to understand how brain mechanisms of spatial reasoning are brought into play during symbolic mathematical cognition and to identify individual differences in these mechanisms that co-vary with mathematical ability and mathematical experience.
NeuroDiscovery | Seed Grant
Autism is a highly genetic developmental brain disorder which is characterized by social impairments. Autism affects 1 in 68 US children, with an annual cost in the US of $250 billion dollars. Unfortunately, the basic biology of autism remains poorly understood. Consequently, there are currently no...
NeuroHealth | Seed Grant
To combat age related macular degeneration, we propose to identify genes that increase survival of the light sensing nerves of the eye.
NeuroEngineering | Seed Grant
Lead Researcher(s): Jun Ding, Nicholas Melosh
We will engineer next generation bundled microwires deep brain stimulation using microwires that are thinner than human hair. We will use a small LED display to deliver patterned stimulation by ‘playing a video’ on the display chip, where each pixel is connected to a microwire.

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